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Table 2 Physician and Patient Characteristics during the year of transition

From: The impact of the adoption of a patient rostering model on primary care access and continuity of care in urban family practices in Ontario, Canada

Characteristic N Percentage (%)
Physicians
Sex
 Male 2088 63.5
 Female 1203 36.5
Canadian Trained 2502 76.0
Panel size
  < 500 129 3.9
 500–999 676 20.5
 1000–1999 1834 55.7
 2000–2999 580 17.6
  > 3000 72 2.2
Years since Grad (mean, SD) 24.7 (9.5)  
Patients
Sex
 Male 1,655,749 43.6
 Female 2,143,143 56.4
Age (mean, SD) 41.4 (22.1)  
 </=19 750,427 19.8
 20–39 956,271 25.2
 40–59 1,264,563 33.3
 60–79 677,578 17.8
 >/=80 150,053 4.0
Rurality
 Urban 3,528,411 92.9
 Sub-urban 228,313 6.0
 Rural 34,190 1.0
 Missing 7978 0.02
Income Quintilea
 1 726,353 19.1
 2 750,767 19.8
 3 753,366 19.8
 4 773,195 20.4
 5 788,390 20.8
 Missing 6821 0.2
Adjusted Clinical Group (ACG)b
 0 47,988 1.3
 1–4 1,395,673 36.7
 5–9 1,901,853 50.1
 10+ 453,378 11.9
  1. aincome quintile represents the rank of the patient’s total household income based on the aggregate census data derived from postal code. The first quintile represents the highest incomes
  2. bAdjusted Clinical Groups (ACG) quantifies morbidity by grouping patients based on age and gender and all medical diagnoses in a given year. Those in group three represent represents those with the greatest morbidity