Skip to main content

Table 4 Approaches of GPs in specific case scenarios (n = 88 a, n (%))

From: General practitioners’ approaches to prostate-specific antigen testing in the north-east of the Netherlands

Case scenario Never Rarely Sometimes Often Always
PSA test in case of lower urinary tract symptoms 14 (17.3) 27 (33.3) 25 (30.9) 12 (14.8) 3 (3.7)
PSA test in case of unclear discomfort 10 (11.5) 16 (18.4) 40 (46.0) 18 (20.7) 3 (3.4)
DRE before PSA test 3 (3.4) 4 (4.5) 14 (15.9) 44 (50.0) 23 (26.1)
PSA test if DRE suggestive for prostate cancer 7 (8.0) 13 (14.8) 9 (10.2) 19 (21.6) 40 (45.5)
Case scenario Yes No
Are there situations where you would not refer a patient, having a PSA level ≥ 3 ng/mL, to a urologist? 80 (94.1) 5 (5.9)
If a patient has a normal PSA level, do you check the PSA level after some time again? 17 (20.2) 67 (79.8)
Did you perform a DRE on your last patient having lower urinary tract symptoms? 70 (82.4) 15 (17.6)
If a patient actively requests PSA screening, I will …
 perform a PSA test without explanation 1 (1.2)
 inform the patient on the (dis) advantages of the PSA test and order it 39 (45.9)
 inform the patient on the (dis) advantages of the test and make a new appointment to decide if to order one or not 30 (35.3)
 not order a PSA test 8 (9.4)
Others 7 (8.2)
  1. DRE Digital rectal examination, GP General practitioner, PSA Prostate-specific antigen, n/a Not applicable, a numbers (%) of participants. Numbers may not add up to total, due to missing values.