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Table 3 The CME effect on GPs’ knowledge about cancer diagnosis. The proportion of GPs responding most appropriately (MAAA) is shown for each item; one month before (Before) and seven months after (After) the CME. GPs are divided into two groups: CME-participating group and reference group. An effect within a group is shown as a risk ratio (RR0 for the Reference group; RR1 for the CME-participating group). Comparisons between groups are shown as ratio of risk ratios (RR1/RR0)

From: Impact of continuing medical education in cancer diagnosis on GP knowledge, attitude and readiness to investigate – a before-after study

   Reference group CME Participating group Comparison between groups
N = 121 N = 81
  MAAA Before After Before vs. after Before After Before vs. after RR1/RR0 (p*)
% (n) % (n) RR0 (p*) % (n) % (n) RR1 (p*)
What is the likelihood that a 50-year-old patient having cancer at the time you choose to refer the patient to a cancer fast-track pathway? 2–10 % 29.8 (36) 38.8 (47) 1.31 (<0.001) 23.5 (19) 65.4 (53) 2.79 (<0.001) 2.13 (0.009)
What is the likelihood that a patient aged 40 years or more, who is smoker, has lung cancer the second time s/he presents with haemoptysis in your practice? 5–20 % 33.1 (40) 34.7 (42) 1.05 (0.698) 33.3 (27) 58.0 (47) 1.74 (0.010) 1.63 (0.160)
What is the likelihood that a patient aged 40 years or more has colorectal cancer the first time that s/he presents with unintended weight loss and new onset of constipation in your practice? 2–6 % 8.3 (10) 9.9 (12) 1.19 (0.039) 6.2 (5) 28.4 (23) 4.6 (<0.001) 3.83 (0.055)
What is the likelihood that a lung cancer cannot be detected on a chest x-ray at the time of diagnosis? ≥15 % 81.8 (99) 86.0 (104) 1.05 (0.741) 76.5 (62) 81.5 (66) 1.06 (0.243) 1.07 (0.309)
What is the proportion of patients with colorectal cancer who presented an alarm symptom as the first sign of the disease to his/her general practitioner? ≤60 % 81.8 (99) 86.0 (104) 1.05 (0.449) 82.7 (67) 90.1 (73) 1.09 (0.006) 1.04 (0.614)
What is the proportion of patients with ovarian cancer who can be detected by a pelvic examination (palpation) in general practice at the time of diagnosis? ≤41 % 90.0 (110) 94.2 (114) 1.04 (0.078) 85.2 (69) 92.6 (75) 1.09 (0.012) 1.05 (0.322)
  1. Bold = significance level of p ≤ 0.05. *corrected for clustering at the study-step-level